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Pack 430. Pack of two German Heinkel He111 aircraft prints by Anthony Saunders and Robert Taylor.- Art-of-Europe .com
DHM436.  Gauntlet by Anthony Saunders.<p> Portsmouth August 26th 1940, the lone spitfire of Squadron Leader Sandy Johnstone breaks the ranks and picks off one of the menacing Heinkels only to encounter an equally determined attack from a BF109. <br><br>We were brought to readiness in the middle of lunch and scrambled to intercept mixed bag of 100+ Heinkel IIIs and DO 17s approaching Portsmouth from the South.  The controller did a first class job and positioned us one thousand feet above the target. with the sun  behind us, allowing us to spot the raiders from a long way off. No escorting Messchersmitts were in sight at the time, although a sizable force was to turn up soon after. then something strange happened.  I was about to give a ticking off to our chaps for misusing the R/T when I realised I was listening to German voices. It appeared we were both using the same frequency and, although having no knowledge of the language it sounded from the monotonous flow of the conversation that they were unaware of our presence. as soon  as we dived towards the leading formation, however we were assailed immediately to loud shouts of  Achtung Spitfuern Spitfuern! as our bullets began to take their toll.  In spite of having taken jerry by surprise our bag was only six, with others claimed as damaged, before the remainder dived for cloud cover and turned for home. In the meantime the escorting fighters were amongst us when two of our fellows were badly shot up. Hector Maclean stopped a cannon shell on his cockpit, blowing his foot off above the ankle although, in spite of his grave injuries, he managed to fly his spitfire back to Tangmere to land with wheels retracted. Cyril Babbages aircraft was also badly damaged in the action. forcing him to abandon it and take to his parachute. He was ultimately picked up by a rescue launch and put ashore at Bognor, having suffered only minor injuries.  I personally accounted for one Heinkel III in the action (Sandy Johnson) . <br><br>No. 602 City of Glasgow auxiliary squadron was a household name long before WWII began. It had been the first auxiliary squadron to get into the air in 1925, two of its members, Lord Clydeside and David McIntyre  were the first to conquer Mount Everest in 1933: the squadron sweeped the board in gunnery and bombing in 1935, beating the regular squadrons at their own game. It was the first auxiliary Squadron to be equipped with Spitfire Fighters as far back as March 1939 and it was the first squadron to shoot down the first enemy aircraft on British soil.  The squadron moved south from Drem airfield in East Lothian on August 14th 1940 to relieve the already battered no. 145 squadron at Westhampnett, Tangmeres satelitte station in Sussex. The squadron suffered 5 casualties during the battle. The squadron remained at Westhampnett until December 1940 to be replaced by no. 610 auxiliary airforce squadron. No 602 squadron itself remained active up until 1957 when it was put into mothballs.  <b><p> Signed by  three pilots of 602 Squadron: Air Vice Marshal Sandy Johnstone CB DFC AE DL (deceased), <br>Air Commodore Mickey Mount CBE DSO DFC (deceased) <br>and <br>Wing Commander Hector MacLean (deceased). <p> Signed limited edition of 950 prints.  <p>Image size 20 inches x 13 inches (51cm x 33cm)
DHM2627. Fury of Assault by Robert Taylor. <p> When Luftwaffe bombers first appeared in force in the night skies over London in September 1940 they heralded the beginning of The Blitz - the most sustained period of concentrated bombing aimed at British cities during World War II. Robert Taylors evocative painting brings to life the frightening scenario of the Luftwaffes night bombing campaign. It is December 1941, and London is once again under concentrated attack. With fires raging below, the armada of German bombers is clearly visible in the night sky as they sweep across the city. Shimmering in the glow of destruction, a lone Hurricane night-fighter from 85 Squadron, based at nearby Gravesend, engages Heinkel 111s of KG55 in a desperate attempt to break up the formations. <b><p> Signed by Flight Lieutenant Roy Daines DFM, <br>Oberleutnant Joachim Berking, <br>Unteroffizier Fahnenjunker Walter Bogdan, <br>Oberleutnant Heinrich Sudel (deceased) <br>and <br>Oberleutnant Karl-Horst Meyer zum Felde. <p> Signed limited edition of 700 prints. <p> Paper size 29 inches x 23.5 inches (74cm x 60cm)

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Pack 430. Pack of two German Heinkel He111 aircraft prints by Anthony Saunders and Robert Taylor.

PCK0430. Pack of two WW2 German aviation prints by Anthony Saunders and Robert Taylor depicting RAF fighters in combat with Luftwaffe Heinkel He111s during the Battle of Britain.

Aviation Print Pack.

Items in this pack :

Item #1 - Click to view individual item

DHM436. Gauntlet by Anthony Saunders.

Portsmouth August 26th 1940, the lone spitfire of Squadron Leader Sandy Johnstone breaks the ranks and picks off one of the menacing Heinkels only to encounter an equally determined attack from a BF109.

We were brought to readiness in the middle of lunch and scrambled to intercept mixed bag of 100+ Heinkel IIIs and DO 17s approaching Portsmouth from the South. The controller did a first class job and positioned us one thousand feet above the target. with the sun behind us, allowing us to spot the raiders from a long way off. No escorting Messchersmitts were in sight at the time, although a sizable force was to turn up soon after. then something strange happened. I was about to give a ticking off to our chaps for misusing the R/T when I realised I was listening to German voices. It appeared we were both using the same frequency and, although having no knowledge of the language it sounded from the monotonous flow of the conversation that they were unaware of our presence. as soon as we dived towards the leading formation, however we were assailed immediately to loud shouts of Achtung Spitfuern Spitfuern! as our bullets began to take their toll. In spite of having taken jerry by surprise our bag was only six, with others claimed as damaged, before the remainder dived for cloud cover and turned for home. In the meantime the escorting fighters were amongst us when two of our fellows were badly shot up. Hector Maclean stopped a cannon shell on his cockpit, blowing his foot off above the ankle although, in spite of his grave injuries, he managed to fly his spitfire back to Tangmere to land with wheels retracted. Cyril Babbages aircraft was also badly damaged in the action. forcing him to abandon it and take to his parachute. He was ultimately picked up by a rescue launch and put ashore at Bognor, having suffered only minor injuries. I personally accounted for one Heinkel III in the action (Sandy Johnson) .

No. 602 City of Glasgow auxiliary squadron was a household name long before WWII began. It had been the first auxiliary squadron to get into the air in 1925, two of its members, Lord Clydeside and David McIntyre were the first to conquer Mount Everest in 1933: the squadron sweeped the board in gunnery and bombing in 1935, beating the regular squadrons at their own game. It was the first auxiliary Squadron to be equipped with Spitfire Fighters as far back as March 1939 and it was the first squadron to shoot down the first enemy aircraft on British soil. The squadron moved south from Drem airfield in East Lothian on August 14th 1940 to relieve the already battered no. 145 squadron at Westhampnett, Tangmeres satelitte station in Sussex. The squadron suffered 5 casualties during the battle. The squadron remained at Westhampnett until December 1940 to be replaced by no. 610 auxiliary airforce squadron. No 602 squadron itself remained active up until 1957 when it was put into mothballs.

Signed by three pilots of 602 Squadron: Air Vice Marshal Sandy Johnstone CB DFC AE DL (deceased),
Air Commodore Mickey Mount CBE DSO DFC (deceased)
and
Wing Commander Hector MacLean (deceased).

Signed limited edition of 950 prints.

Image size 20 inches x 13 inches (51cm x 33cm)


Item #2 - Click to view individual item

DHM2627. Fury of Assault by Robert Taylor.

When Luftwaffe bombers first appeared in force in the night skies over London in September 1940 they heralded the beginning of The Blitz - the most sustained period of concentrated bombing aimed at British cities during World War II. Robert Taylors evocative painting brings to life the frightening scenario of the Luftwaffes night bombing campaign. It is December 1941, and London is once again under concentrated attack. With fires raging below, the armada of German bombers is clearly visible in the night sky as they sweep across the city. Shimmering in the glow of destruction, a lone Hurricane night-fighter from 85 Squadron, based at nearby Gravesend, engages Heinkel 111s of KG55 in a desperate attempt to break up the formations.

Signed by Flight Lieutenant Roy Daines DFM,
Oberleutnant Joachim Berking,
Unteroffizier Fahnenjunker Walter Bogdan,
Oberleutnant Heinrich Sudel (deceased)
and
Oberleutnant Karl-Horst Meyer zum Felde.

Signed limited edition of 700 prints.

Paper size 29 inches x 23.5 inches (74cm x 60cm)


Website Price: £ 260.00  

To purchase these prints individually at their normal retail price would cost £450.00 . By buying them together in this special pack, you save £190




All prices are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

 

Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo


The signature of Air Commodore Mickey Mount CBE DSO DFC (deceased)

Air Commodore Mickey Mount CBE DSO DFC (deceased)
*Signature Value : £55 (matted)

Flying Officer C.J Mount joined NO.602 squadron on August 8th 1940 after a brief conversion course on Spitfires. On August 18th his Spitfire L1005 was severely damaged in combat with JU 87s and BF109s over Ford. Micky was unhurt. he again escaped injury when his Spitfire X4270 was damaged landing at Tangmere. he served in many of the theatres of WW2 and he flew Hurricanes in Malta and North Africa and Wellingtons in the Middle east. Micky retired and lived in Ascot in Berkshire. He died 4th August 2002.


Air Vice Marshal Sandy Johnstone CB DFC AE DL (deceased)
*Signature Value : £50 (matted)

Early in 1938, Johnstone was a civilian navigation instructor at Scottish Aviation, moving later to the Civil Air Navigation School at Prestwick. In August 1939 he was called to full-time service with 602 Squadron. After some Spitfire engagements off the Scottish coast, he received command of 602 - he was still only 24 - and led it south to the tiny airfield at West Hampnett, in West Sussex, where it was stationed throughout the Battle of Britain. Sandy was in command of no. 602 squadron during the critical days of the Battle of Britain, flying with the squadron before the war though to 1941, when he was posted to the Middle east, he also served with 229 and 249 squadrons in Malta during the Islands most fateful days of the war. Sandy became a successful author and resided near Ipswich in Suffolk. Sandy Johnstone died 13th December 2000, aged 84.
Wing Commander Hector MacLean (deceased)
*Signature Value : £55 (matted)

Hector was flying with No 602 squadron before war broke out. A gallant young man, his fighter pilot days were drawn to an abrupt halt on August 26th 1940 when his leg was severely injured during battle, but the war was by no means over. After his recovery he was posted to Rosemount for duty as a fighter controller, in the rank of Squadron Leader. Hector retired and lived in Kilmacolm near Glasgow. He died on 19th July 2007.
Signatures on item 2
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo
Flight Lieutenant Roy Daines DFM
*Signature Value : £40 (matted)

Roy Daines joined the RAF as soon as he was able, and after completing his hurried training as a pilot, was posted to join 247 Squadron in the autumn of 1940. Here he flew Gladiators and Hurricanes on coastal patrols, 247 being the only squadron to fly Gladiators during the Battle of Britain, before converting to nightfighting Hurricanes. Later, in 1943, he flew Typhoons with 247 before being posted to join 65 Squadron flying Spitfires and Mustangs.


Oberleutnant Heinrich Sudel (deceased)
*Signature Value : £30 (matted)

Having joined the Luftwaffe in 1937, Heinrich Sudel was an experienced Observer in He111s by the time war broke out. He flew a total of 408 combat missions in Heinkels, both in the West over France and England, and on the Eastern Front. In September 1940 whilst over England, his aircraft was badly damaged by RAF fighters, but his pilot managed to reach the safety of the French coast on one engine. He finished the war commanding L/KG55, and had been awarded the Knights Cross, the Iron Cross I and II, and the German Cross in Gold. Heinrich Sudel passed away on 12th August 2011.
Oberleutnant Joachim Berking
*Signature Value : £25 (matted)

Joining the Luftwafte in November 1939, Joachim Berking was commissioned and trained as a pilot on Ju52s and He111s as part of KG53 based at Lille in northern France. In May 1942 he was posted to KG55 Grief in Russia, joining the 4th Staffel based in Djepropetrowsk, where he completed 291 combat missions, of which 60 were night operations. In November 1943 he returned to France to become head of training of 1 L/KG5 5 at Dijon. After this posting he converted to fighters, training on the Me109, and in April 1945 was posted to command 4./JG27 Marseille. He received the Iron Cross I and II, the German Cross in Gold, and a special honorary trophy from Reichsmarschall Hermann Goering for outstanding services in air combat.
Oberleutnant Karl-Horst Meyer zum Felde
*Signature Value : £25 (matted)

With a passion for flying Karl-Horst joined the Luftwafte in October 1938, and following the outbreak of war he flew night operations as a pilot with KG55 over France before taking part in the great Blitz raids over England. After the invasion of Russia he transferred to the Eastern Front and fought at Stalingrad, making several emergency landings including one major incident when, having lost an engine to enemy action, he made a forced landing on one engine in the countryside of south Russia, where he had to join German ground units. He flew both He111s and Ju88s during the war, and was awarded the German Cross in Gold.
Unteroffizier Fahnenjunker Walter Bogdan
*Signature Value : £25 (matted)

Walter Bogdan joined the Luftwaffe in March 1941, and after completing his training as a radio operator, was posted to join KG55 flying Heinkel He111s. He flew over 110 combat missions in He111s as radio operator to Leutnant Kessler. On their seventh mission they were forced to make an emergency landing during the siege of Stalingrad, and in April 1944 encountered a second emergency landing on his 75th mission. His final and 110th mission occured in July 1944 when, attacking Brjansk railway station, his aircraft was hit 122 times, but he and his pilot managed to get their aircraft safely home.

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